September 21

Ep. 0077: History of Irregular Warfare with Bill Buppert (Part 1)

This episode is the first part of my conversation with Bill Buppert on the history of irregular warfare.

Bill Buppert is a retired Army officer. He has been a writer for a number of publications including lewrockwell.com. He is particularly interested in the issues of liberty, survival, shooting and history. He has made frequent media appearances. He wishes to continue the abolitionist project of men like William Wilberforce and Lysander Spooner.  A recognized authority on irregular and guerrilla warfare, he is the founder and publisher of zerogov.com.

Join CJ & Bill as they discuss:

  • The 4 Generations of Modern War
  • The meaning of terms such as irregular warfare, guerrilla warfare, terrorism, and insurgency
  • The concept of counterinsurgency, or COIN
  • The earliest manifestations of irregular warfare in human history (or prehistory)

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August 28

Ep. 0074: The Western Way of War vs the Eastern Way of War

To begin laying some of the groundwork for the upcoming miniseries on the history of modern guerrilla and unconventional war, here’s a discussion of two different paradigms of what war is supposed to be and how it is supposed to be fought.  One is the Western (or European) Way, which originated in Greece and from there filtered through the Romans to become the dominant paradigm among Westerners to this day. The other is the Eastern (or Asian) Way, which originated in China and from there filtered to other parts of the Asian world and beyond, and which forms the intellectual basis of much of modern guerrilla tactics and strategy.

Join Prof CJ as he discusses:

  • The origins of the Western Way and how it has evolved over the centuries
  • The origins of the Eastern Way and how it has evolved over the centuries
  • Why this matters to understanding the modern world in general, and the history of modern unconventional warfare in particular

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August 11

Ep. 0072: The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima & Nagasaki

This month is the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and the subsequent surrender of Japan to the United States, ending World War II.  The standard mainstream American narrative about this portrays it as a no-brainer, a morally unquestionable & absolutely necessary decision that saved untold numbers of lives.  This narrative is not supported by many serious academic historians who are experts on this topic these days, and it is highly questioned in countries other than the United States, to put it mildly.  What’s the truth about these bombings?

Join Prof CJ as he discusses:

  • A brief word on mass-bombing of civilians in WWII, and how prior to its entry into the war, the US government condemned any mass bombing of civilians, but began engaging in it on a larger scale than anyone else once in the war
  • The successful “Trinity” test of an A-bomb, and the effect that had on the US government’s decision-making
  • What was going on in the Japanese government & in the US government at the time
  • The Potsdam Conference & Declaration of July, 1945
  • The bombing of Hiroshima & its effects
  • The entry of the Soviet Union into the war against Japan & its effects
  • The bombing of Nagasaki & its effects [*Note:  Had an error I made here pointed out by a listener named Matt via Facebook: I said in the episode that Enola Gay also dropped the second bomb; it did not.  The E-G was involved in the 2nd mission as a weather recon plane, but another B-29 named “Bockscar” actually dropped the 2nd bomb.  I messed that detail up in my notes & as a result messed it up in the episode.]
  • Japan’s surrender
  • Some closing thoughts & observations on the bombings, their morality (or lack thereof), and debates that have continued ever since

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June 1

Ep. 0062: The American Revolution Part V: Ending the War, Winners & Losers

Join Prof CJ as he discusses:

  • The British government’s cessation of hostilities following Yorktown
  • The Paris Peace talks & the terms of Treaty of Paris, 1783
  • Why the British lost the war
  • Winners & Losers as a result of this war, which is a more complicated topic than you might think

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May 21

Ep. 0061: The American Revolution Part IV: 1778-81

Join Prof CJ as he discusses:

  • The increasingly influential counterrevolutionary faction among the independence leaders, as exemplified by John Adams & his essay, “Thoughts on Government”
  • The largely mythical “Conway Cabal” against George Washington
  • The fate of radical & guerrilla warfare advocate Gen. Charles Lee
  • The impact of French & Spanish intervention
  • Baron Von Steuben’s effects (for good & ill) on the Continental Army
  • Benedict Arnold’s Betrayal
  • The British switch to a Southern strategy, which initially goes well for them
  • How the British began to get bogged down by partisan warfare and chaos in the Backcountry, and how clever American commanders such as Nathanael Greene and Daniel Morgan were able to turn the tide
  • The retreat of the British Southern Army to Yorktown, VA, and their ultimate surrender to a Franco-American force in 1781, ending major military operations of the war

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May 12

Ep. 0060: The American Revolution Part III: 1776-1777

Join Prof CJ as he discusses:

  • Thomas Paine & Common Sense
  • The British evacuation of Boston
  • The Declaration of Independence
  • An overview of some of the military operations and battles of 1776-7, including Long Island, Trenton, Bennington, and Saratoga
  • The winter of 1777-78 at Valley Forge
  • A word about the 1777 British government document, “Considerations on the Great Question, What is Fit to Be Done with America?”

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April 28

Ep. 0059: The American Revolution Part II: 1775

 

Join Prof CJ as he discusses:

  • Some thoughts on Great Man historical narratives
  • An overview of what was happening in terms of rising tensions in late-1774 and early-1775, much of which related to British attempts to limit colonists’ access to weapons and gunpowder
  • A fairly detailed account of the Battle of Lexington & Concord on April 19, 1775
  • The actions of the Continental Congress, including the appointment of George Washington as Commander of the new Continental Army, and its consequences for the war and the future of America
  • Ethan Allen & his Green Mountain Boys
  • Some other early battles
  • The situation as of the close of 1775

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April 17

Ep. 0058: The American Revolution, Part I: 1763-1774

Since this April is the 240th anniversary of the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, Prof CJ has decided to do a multi-part Dangerous History Podcast series on this conflict, trying to focus as much as possible on the dangerous parts of the story, and the deeper implications of it, that the Man would rather omit from the narrative.

Join Prof CJ as he discusses:

  •  The state of affairs in the aftermath of the Seven Years War (aka French & Indian War)
  • The various ways the British government attempted to increase their tax revenues from the North American colonies, and the resulting resistance from some of the colonists
  • A look at the average, grassroots insurgents, including who they were and what motivated them
  • The little-known False Alarm incident of September 1774, in which a rumor spread throughout the northeastern colonies that the British Navy had destroyed Boston, and the resulting spontaneous mobilization of thousands of New Englanders to get revenge, which was aborted when the rumor proved false, but which showed how quickly ordinary people could and would mobilize

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August 25

Ep. 0024: The Second Seminole War

Last time, we covered the First Seminole War; this time, we get to the nastier sequel.

The Second Seminole war was the US government’s longest and most expensive Indian War.  It also had many parallels to later campaigns in harsh environments against determined guerrilla fighters, and many lessons which, unfortunately, were not learned, as the nation did its best to consign the conflict to the ‘memory hole’ soon after its end.  Long before the Philippines War, and even longer before Vietnam, there was this brutal war…

Join Prof CJ as he discusses:

  • The 1823 Treaty of Moultrie Creek, which tried to confine the Seminoles to a reservation in central Florida, requiring most of them to relocate, cutting off their access to the coasts, denying their freedom of movement, and requiring them to assist in the capture and return of escaped slaves
  • The election of Andrew Jackson as president in 1828, which would have disastrous consequences for Southeastern Indians, including the Seminole
  • The Indian Removal Act and subsequent attempts to bribe or dupe the Seminoles into relocating out West
  • The rise of Osceola
  • The beginning of violence in 1835 with the so-called ‘Dade Massacre’ and assassination of the US Indian Agent Wiley Thompson
  • How US General Thomas Jesup captured Osceola by betraying a flag of truce, something even most white Americans found dishonorable
  • Osceola’s captivity and death from illness within a few months
  • The brutal Battle of Lake Okeechobee on Christmas Day, 1837
  • Continued Seminole guerrilla operations and American countermeasures, which sought to grind them down
  • The cessation of fighting in 1842, by which time the Seminole population of Florida had been reduced by approximately 94% in 20 years due to death and deportation
  • A brief mention of the much smaller Third Seminole War (1855-58)
  • Some concluding thoughts about this war from historians who have written about it extensively, and from Prof CJ

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August 21

Ep. 0023: How the United States Acquired Florida (the First Seminole War)

This is the little-known story of how Florida became a part of Team America.  (Spoiler:  It wasn’t totally voluntary…)

Join Prof CJ as he discusses:

  • The background to the war:  what was going on in Florida leading up to the war, & who the Seminoles were, including the so-called ‘Black Seminoles’
  • Why the United States coveted Florida almost from day one of getting its independence
  • The destruction of the so-called “Negro Fort” by American forces in 1816
  • The immediate issues that led to fighting beginning in late 1817, culminating in Andrew Jackson’s invasion of West Florida in 1818
  • How Jackson exceeded his orders (which just allowed him to retaliate against hostile Indians), and went so far as to seize Spanish installations and execute two Brits who were found in the area
  • Secretary of State John Quincy Adams’ successful negotiation of a treaty in 1819 formally transferring Florida (East and West) to the US without provoking war or major retaliations from either Spain or Britain
  • How, even after the American takeover of Florida, Americans continued to see the Seminoles as a major problem, one that would be ‘dealt with’  beginning in the 1830s with the Second Seminole, which was much larger and costlier than the First, and which we’ll cover next episode
  • The troubling precedent set for the American Republic by Jackson’s actions in this undeclared war

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