July 3

Ep. 0009: The Philippines War, Part II

Here it is — part II of Prof CJ’s take on the American war against the Filipinos.

Join Prof CJ as he discusses:

  • How Americans had little to no sympathy for Filipinos
  • The ‘pacification’ of the island of Samar & the court-martial of Major Waller
  • How imperialists vilified their political opponents as unpatriotic traitors rather than principled dissenters
  • Characteristics of imperialists, including their youth & their Progressive ideology (in other words, Imperialists were Progressives & vice-versa – exhibit A being Teddy Roosevelt himself)
  • How the US declared victory in 1902 (even though fighting wasn’t quite done in some places)
  • Quotes looking back on the war from contemporary imperialists & anti-imperialists
  • Some closing thoughts and observations about this war and its troubling legacy, including Americans’ eagerness then (as now) to quickly self-induce amnesia in order to forget morally dubious wars
  • How unhappy truths are some of the most important truths with which one must come to grips, if one wishes to avoid future ills
  • In the words of Patrick Henry:  “For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst and provide for it.”

Prof CJ’s Picks (buy from Amazon via these links to help support the show at no additional cost to you)

 



Copyright © 2014. All rights reserved.

Posted July 3, 2014 by profcj in category "American History", "Military History", "Podcasts

2 COMMENTS :

  1. By DrewfromOz on

    Can’t believe your ‘cast didn’t get any comments- it’s a fascinating part of American Colonial(would calling it Imperial be taking it a little too far….?) history that few folks hear about.
    Enjoyed it immensely. Thanks.

    Reply
    1. By profcj (Post author) on

      Thanks, glad you liked it.

      I absolutely would call this war a”imperial”, possibly the most blatantly imperial war in US history (other than maybe some of the larger Indian wars, such as the Seminole Wars in Florida that I covered in episodes 23 & 24.)

      As to why these Filipino War episodes didn’t get much comments, I think the answer is mostly that these were early episodes, so at the time they were released my audience was very small. My audience has grown tremendously in the past 6 months or so, and a lot of these newer listeners are still in the process of listening to the back catalog, as you’re doing now.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.